• School Assignment
    • Assignment System Fraud
      • The San Francisco School Districts assignment system has some unpublicized features. Stan Goldberg also talks about Transitional Kindergarten and the School district’s treatment of the “TK 400”
      • Press to watch show
    • Twins
      • School started and Jennifer Block Martin still had not got a placement for her twins. Hear how it turned out
      • Press to view show
    • Assignment update
      • As the school year progresses the San Francisco Unified School District School Assignment crisis deepens. Josie Owens updates us about some of the families that she has been advocating for to get a school assignment for their child that was workable.
      • Press to watch show
    • No room at school
      • It was the first day of school for most children of the San Francisco Unified School District however not the children of the hundreds of parents that went to School District headquarters to try to get a school placement that was acceptable to them. First we hear parent advocate Josie Owens..
      • Press to watch show
    • Retiring Pac member
      • We have seen controversy surrounding the new school assignment system in the past few years while it was being crafted by the San Francisco Unified School District Board of Education. Now the new system has been approved by the Board of Education and elements of it had been in operation for two years. Michelle Jacques-Menegaz, the just retired, four-year member of the Parent Advisory Council (PAC) of the San Francisco Unified School District joins me to discuss her insider’s view of what went on while the school assignment system was being developed. She shares her insight on the parent conversations that were held around the city by the PAC and Parents for Public Schools, San Francisco (PPS-SF). We discuss the current situation and the ongoing efforts that need to be pursued by the School District and parents to build quality schools. We explore some of the levels of trust or mistrust of the School District that parents are currently experiencing around the assignment system. Michelle Jacques-Menegaz a view from the inside.
      • Press to hear show
    • Assignment at risk
      • With the deadline for submitting applications for school assignment in the San Francisco Unified School District rapidly approaching the school district has advised its independent advisors who were scheduled to program the assignment system for free that their services were not needed. Does this action imperil the implementation of the system on time? Has school district transparency move back to the dark ages? Here’s the story from the design team’s perspective.
      • Press to hear show
  • Special Education
    • The State comes to town
      • California Department of Education (CDE) Special Education Compliance Review Meeting came to town and 90 parents showed up at Mission High School to share their experiences with San Francisco Unified School District Special Education Department. The first question the State representative asked set the tone for the evening. “How many here received the invitation to the meeting and a questionnaire that could be mailed in sent by the School District?” No one raised their hand. Parents had heard about the meeting only through the efforts of Support for Families with Disabilities and The Citizens Advisory Council For Special Education. For two hours I heard parent after parent tell of services that were committed to at Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings but are not being delivered. As the allotted time elapsed there were many parents yet to be heard but the meeting was halted. How many more people would have been waiting to be heard if the School District had sent the notices of the meeting out to every parent of a child enrolled in Special Education? I asked many parents as they exited if they wanted to share why they were there that night. Many said no, but three parents said yes and here are their stories.
      • Press to watch show
    • Discrimination
      • On the first day of school some parents were told to visit their child’s classroom and observe they had to give the district 24 hours notice and a district employee must accompany them. Welcome to San Francisco Unified. Hear what happened and why San Francisco Unified may be guilty of discrimination.
      • Press to watch show
    • Visitation revisited
      • On September 20th the San Francisco Briefing Room show we reported about parents with a child in Special Education who were told that in order to visit their child’s classroom they were required to provide 24 hours notice and they had to be accompanied by a District employee. Further investigation revealed a total of three different procedures being practiced for the same request. To state the School District’s position we have Dr. Cecelia Dodge, Assistant Superintendent and Director of Special Education
      • Press to view show
    • SPED Starting fresh
      • In 2008, the San Francisco Unified School District's Special Education department decided to illegally censor the Community Advisory Committee for Special Education’s newsletter. This Committee is state-mandated to provide oversight of SFUSD’s special education department and reports directly to the School Board. The School Board did not support the Committee and allowed the Committee to be censored. As an aftermath of this cataclysmic event, the director of special education retired. Shortly after that, the head of the Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA) also left the school district. After one interim special education director, in the spring of 2010, the school district engaged the services of the Urban Special Education Leadership Collaborative to audit SFUSD’s special education department. David Riley, Executive Director of the Urban Special Education Leadership Collaborative, joins me to elaborate on this far-reaching audit.
      • Press to hear story
    • Inclusion comes to town
      • How do you change the culture and practice of a school district’s special education department? San Francisco is trying to do just that after committing to enacting some of the recommendations of the Urban Special Education Leadership Collaborative audit which found many issues with what San Francisco was doing in special education. Joining me is Richard Carranza, Deputy Superintendent of the San Francisco Unified School District, and Cecilia Dodge, Assistant Superintendent and Director of Special Education and SELPA to explain what the District is doing to foster inclusion in all of the schools of the District and how this is going to effect almost every classroom, teacher, and child in the district.
      • Press to hear story
  • SFUSD Board Candidates 2012
  • Transitional Kindergarten
    • TK Shipwreck
      • Two days before the 2012 kindergarten lottery the San Francisco Superintendent of Schools Carlos Garcia announced that San Francisco would not have Transitional Kindergarten for any child and the children who were to attend could not apply for kindergarten in San Francisco this year thus abandoning a reported 400 families. This is their story
      • Press to watch show
    • Broken Promises
      • San Francisco Unified School district advised an estimated 400 families 2 day before the Kindergarten lottery was to close that the district would not we having Transitional Kindergarten and that their children would note be eligible for school in the fall. Listen to the 3 minute video of the status as of today
      • Press to watch show
  • Teaching Methods
    • My child was retained
      • Three years ago Stephanie Holmes was asked to retain her son from leaving Kindergarten. I saw Stephanie at school after the new school year had started and told her how much I admired her for the making that decision. She has agreed to tell us how it all worked out.
      • Press to watch show
  • Transparency
    • Trust at risk
      • A parent whose child attends a San Francisco Unified School District School expects to be able to visit their child in school unannounced and check on their child’s safety. Not so says a school district lawyer don’t believe what you read in the “Student’s Handbook” you must give 24 hour advance notice. Listen as “Trust” comes to the forefront.
      • Press to watch show
    • Assignment at risk
      • With the deadline for submitting applications for school assignment in the San Francisco Unified School District rapidly approaching the school district has advised its independent advisors who were scheduled to program the assignment system for free that their services were not needed. Does this action imperil the implementation of the system on time? Has school district transparency move back to the dark ages? Here’s the story from the design team’s perspective.
      • Press to hear show
  • Parent Tips
    • How to Stop Bullying
      • Karen Siris a bullying intervention expert joins senior dad Stan Goldberg to discuss how to stop bullying behavior. Karen is the author of "Stand up" a new book to help teach kindergarten through 4th grade how to counter bullying and support positive behaviors.
      • Press to watch show
  • School District Interviews
    • Richard Carranza-Superintendent
      • Superintendent Designate Richard addresses questions on the San Francisco Unified School district’s GATE program and Proposition H funding


      • Press to watch show
    • Visitation revisited
      • On September 20th the San Francisco Briefing Room show we reported about parents with a child in Special Education who were told that in order to visit their child’s classroom they were required to provide 24 hours notice and they had to be accompanied by a District employee. Further investigation revealed a total of three different procedures being practiced for the same request. To state the School District’s position we have Dr. Cecelia Dodge, Assistant Superintendent and Director of Special Education
      • Press to view show
    • Inclusion comes to town
      • How do you change the culture and practice of a school district’s special education department? San Francisco is trying to do just that after committing to enacting some of the recommendations of the Urban Special Education Leadership Collaborative audit which found many issues with what San Francisco was doing in special education. Joining me is Richard Carranza, Deputy Superintendent of the San Francisco Unified School District, and Cecilia Dodge, Assistant Superintendent and Director of Special Education and SELPA to explain what the District is doing to foster inclusion in all of the schools of the District and how this is going to effect almost every classroom, teacher, and child in the district.
      • Press to hear story
  • San Francisco City Leaders
    • No Free Ride
      • In the fall of 2011 a group of civic leaders held a rally in front of San Francisco City Hall to ask for free Muni passes for students who qualify for free or reduced lunch. We first see an excerpt from that rally to see the issue as it was presented and then we hear from the point man of this initiative Supervisor of District 9 David Campos in his office about where it stands today and what it will cost the School District.
      • Press to watch show
    • Margaret Brodkin
      • San Francisco is one of the unique cities of the world. In the United States it has a reputation for being ultra liberal. Those who live there view it’s demographics quite differently. If people think that San Francisco is child- friendly and spends lavishly on its school system they would be wrong. Margaret Brodkin has been a child advocate most of her life. She was Executive Director of the highly respected Coleman Advocates for thirty years, she was head of the city department of Children, Youth and Their Families and recently joined A New Day For Learning. I chat with Margaret about the past, the current issues, and directions for the future. This often outspoken and direct advocate does not disappoint in this 30 minute briefing.
      • Press to hear show
    • Sean Elsbernd- Watchdog of the budget
  • Teaching Issues
    • A-G 1200 students behind
      • The San Francisco Unified School District High School graduating class of 2014 will be the first graduating class that will graduate under the new A-G graduating requirements. It was recently disclosed that over 1900 students, a year and a half before their scheduled graduation, are behind on their requirements and unless steps are taken they will not graduate on time. A number of financial circumstances has conspired to reduce the number of opportunities these students have two catch-up. Two community advocates Gladys Soto and Omar Khalif discuss the situation in separate conversations with Senior Dad Stan Goldberg. What alternatives should be available for these students? Who should pay? Should the Arts be the loser? A-G showdown and unintended consequences.


      • Press to watch show
    • Should we retain
      • KIPP Bayview Academy retains slower learners in their grade. San Francisco Unified does not and socially promotes. Omar Khalif doesn’t hold back as he shares how he sees it.
      • Press to watch show
    • SFUSD Loss is KIPP gain
      • I first met Olivia Boudreaux-Harris outside of San Francisco Unified School District headquarters the first day of School as she tried to register her son in a San Francisco public school. I caught up with her a few weeks later at her son’s old school KIPP Bayview Academy San Francisco to hear her story.
      • Press to watch show
    • Middle School showdown
      • The San Francisco School Board will decide shortly if it is going to implement a feeder school-assignment system for middle schools. Parent pushback, primarily by parents whose children were enrolled in one of the districts language programs caused the middle school assignment-process to be delayed for a year. It is now time for the School Board to vote on what will happen next. There are many conflicting issues. Rachel Norton joins me to explain what is in the proposal from the School District and what is not. Straight answers from Commissioner Norton “because people have a right to know”.
      • Press to hear show
    • $24 million gift
      • I attended a meeting where the Director of Community Outreach of the United States Department of Education Alberto Retana told us about title I school improvement grant funds. Watch an excerpt from his opening remarks and an analysis on which schools are effected and how parents can help guide this $24 million @ year gift.
      • Press to watch show
    • Cut to the bone
      • With the San Francisco Unified School District facing a $130 million shortfall, parents are concerned that class sizes will soar and teachers will be fired. To the south of us, in Los Angeles their school district is facing a billion-dollar deficit. Can we look to LA as a model of what can happen in San Francisco? Returning from recently testifying before Congress, Bill Ring from TransParent® joins me to share what he has seen of the negotiations surrounding the new education bills in Sacramento that should qualify California for the “Race to the top” lottery. Teacher layoffs, school privatization, and school closures are the residue of systems that struggle to balance budgets while ignoring the educational needs of their children.
      • Press to hear show
  • Truly San Francisco
    • Gentle Ben
      • The city’s Rec and Park department has a laundry list of vital services and support for the hearing impaired, the sight impaired, and seniors. One such program is Project Insight run by Bernardus Oude Kamphuis, 6 foot 7 inch, “Gentle Ben”. I first met Ben at Camp Mather, the family camp run by Rec and Park near the Hetch Hetchy Dam and Yosemite. Ben was leading a group of sight impaired young people in tent camping. Ben joins me on a Skype-video to tell me about Project Insight programs, who is served by them and how Project Insight may be discarded because of budget cuts. Can Rec and Park find the money to save this critical program? Watch or listen to Gentle Ben.
      • Press to watch show
    • Straight talk from Brodkin
      • San Francisco is one of the unique cities of the world. In the United States it has a reputation for being ultra liberal. Those who live there view it’s demographics quite differently. If people think that San Francisco is child- friendly and spends lavishly on its school system they would be wrong. Margaret Brodkin has been a child advocate most of her life. She was Executive Director of the highly respected Coleman Advocates for thirty years, she was head of the city department of Children, Youth and Their Families and recently joined A New Day For Learning. I chat with Margaret about the past, the current issues, and directions for the future. This often outspoken and direct advocate does not disappoint in this 30 minute briefing.
      • Press to hear story
    • Secure Communities
      • Is San Francisco’s participation in “Secure Communities” more draconian than the new Arizona immigrant law? Will Secure Communities threaten to turn over 40,000 San Francisco residents to immigration to be deported? Immigrant rights advocate Barbara Lopez joins me to tell me if it can happen and how it is intertwined with the politics of the Mayor’s race and the race for the top offices in the State. Barbara endorses Gavin Newsom for Lieutenant Governor, sort of, and we discuss some of the potential candidates for Mayor. Barbara is never known for holding back and this is no exception. Barbara Lopez—will the dark ages return?
      • Press to watch show
    • Open Studios Oakland
      • I visited the Oakland open studios and here is my chats with two artists there Lara Hoke and Laura Malone. the show continues next week-end. total running time 9 minutes. the photo of me in the video was taken by lara Hoke, all the other stills were taken by me.
      • Press to watch show
  • SFUSD-UESF issues
    • Settlement
      • The San Francisco School District and the United educators of San Francisco have reached a tentative agreement to establish the conditions for the next school year. I give my view of the settlement and what is still on the table from this parents point of view.
      • Press to hear show
    • UESF President Dennis Kelly
      • There have been extensive discussions lately that the seniority system keeps schools from removing unsuitable teachers. I asked Dennis Kelly, President of the United Educators of San Francisco, about this and other issues effecting schools. We discuss the current state of negotiations with the San Francisco Unified School District and confront this as well as prospects of a strike. Money, management purgatives, and teaching conditions are debated. Will this be settled peacefully or will the relationship between OUR responsible school district and OUR dedicated teachers lay crumbled and shattered? Hear Dennis Kelly to help you decide what lies ahead.
      • Press to hear show
    • Tom Ruiz SFUSD lead negotiator
      • There have been extensive discussions lately that the seniority system keeps schools from removing unsuitable teachers. I asked Tom Ruiz, Senior Executive Director, Labor Relations and lead negotiator of the San Francisco Unified School District about this and other issues effecting schools. We discuss the current state of negotiations with the United Educators of San Francisco and confront this as well as prospects of a strike. Tom gives us a tiny peak at who won’t be coming back in the fall. Will this be settled peacefully or will the relationship between OUR responsible school district and OUR dedicated teachers lay crumbled and shattered? Hear Tom Ruiz to help you decide what lies ahead. Then this parent shares what he sees and what he’s not hearing.
      • Press to hear show

San Francisco Briefing Room

 

  The Senior Dad San Francisco Briefing Room broadcasts stories about parenting and education as it relates to people in San Francisco. Parents from other parts of the country may find stories here that relate to their part of the country as well. As a parent you are your child's best hope, other parents are your best hope. We learn together.
Senior Dad Briefing Room

 

With contract negotiations with the San Francisco Unified School District at a critical point Dennis Kelly President of United Educators of San Francisco (UESF) joins Stan Goldberg to discuss the contract proposals from the union. They also discuss critical issues to parents around teacher evaluations and how students are taught.
Over the last two years parents having children attending schools in the San Francisco Unified School District have noticed an ever shrinking list of services targeting faster learners. The perception is that the school district is concentrating on the lowest achieving students only. Recently Elizabeth Weise a parent who lives in San Francisco researched the education marketplace and posted her findings on her blog (http://elizabethweise.wordpress.com/). She joins Stan Goldberg to discuss her findings and why San Francisco schools appear to be losing the fastest-growing segment in the educational marketplace, the middle class.

The San Francisco Unified School District Special Education department took the unusual step of advising the 2100 parents of students who receive special education extended school year services of their summer assignments by a backpack. Hundreds of jobs are now in limbo. Hear about the situation to date.

This was on the CAC facebbok page on May 8, 2013 the day after the Podcast was posted:

Update:
SFUSD Extended School Year (ESY) Summer Services: ESY school location assignments will be mailed to parents next week. Many parents did not get the letters that were sent home with their children, so families who have not yet responded will receive letters in the mail. It's important for parents to return the letters as soon as possible.
...Community Advisory Committee for Special Education Special Education

 

The San Francisco Unified School District High School graduating class of 2014 will be the first graduating class that will graduate under the new A-G graduating requirements. It was recently disclosed that over 1900 students, a year and a half before their scheduled graduation, are behind on their requirements and unless steps are taken they will not graduate on time. A number of financial circumstances has conspired to reduce the number of opportunities these students have two catch-up. Two community advocates Gladys Soto and Omar Khalif discuss the situation in separate conversations with Senior Dad Stan Goldberg. What alternatives should be available for these students? Who should pay? Should the Arts be the loser? A-G showdown and unintended consequences.

Karen Siris a bullying intervention expert joins senior dad Stan Goldberg to discuss how to stop bullying behavior. Karen is the author of "Stand up" a new book to help teach kindergarten through 4th grade how to counter bullying and support positive behaviors.

A parent whose child attends a San Francisco Unified School District School expects to be able to visit their child in school unannounced and check on their child’s safety. Not so says a school district lawyer don’t believe what you read in the “Student’s Handbook” you must give 24 hour advance notice. Listen as “Trust” comes to the forefront.
In the fall of 2011 a group of civic leaders held a rally in front of San Francisco City Hall to ask for free Muni passes for students who qualify for free or reduced lunch. We first see an excerpt from that rally to see the issue as it was presented and then we hear from the point man of this initiative Supervisor of District 9 David Campos in his office about where it stands today and what it will cost the School District.
Superintendent Designate Richard addresses questions on the San Francisco Unified School district’s GATE program and Proposition H funding
The San Francisco School Districts assignment system has some unpublicized features. Stan Goldberg also talks about Transitional Kindergarten and the School district’s treatment of the “TK 400”
Two days before the 2012 kindergarten lottery the San Francisco Superintendent of Schools Carlos Garcia announced that San Francisco would not have Transitional Kindergarten for any child and the children who were to attend could not apply for kindergarten in San Francisco this year thus abandoning a reported 400 families. This is their story
San Francisco Unified School district advised an estimated 400 families 2 day before the Kindergarten lottery was to close that the district would not we having Transitional Kindergarten and that their children would note be eligible for school in the fall. Listen to the 3 minute video of the status as of today
California Department of Education (CDE) Special Education Compliance Review Meeting came to town and 90 parents showed up at Mission High School to share their experiences with San Francisco Unified School District Special Education Department. The first question the State representative asked set the tone for the evening. “How many here received the invitation to the meeting and a questionnaire that could be mailed in sent by the School District?”  No one raised their hand. Parents had heard about the meeting only through the efforts of Support for Families with Disabilities and The Citizens Advisory Council For Special Education. For two hours I heard parent after parent tell of services that were committed to at Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings but are not being delivered. As the allotted time elapsed there were many parents yet to be heard but the meeting was halted. How many more people would have been waiting to be heard if the School District had sent the notices of the meeting out to every parent of a child enrolled in Special Education? I asked many parents as they exited if they wanted to share why they were there that night. Many said no, but three parents said yes and here are their stories.
On the first day of school some parents were told to visit their child’s classroom and observe they had to give the district 24 hours notice and a district employee must accompany them. Welcome to San Francisco Unified. Hear what happened and why San Francisco Unified may be guilty of discrimination
Three years ago Stephanie Holmes was asked to retain her son from leaving Kindergarten.  I saw Stephanie at school after the new school year had started and told her how much I admired her for the making that decision. She has agreed to tell us how it all worked out.
On September 20th the San Francisco Briefing Room show we reported about parents with a child in Special Education who were told that in order to visit their child’s classroom they were required to provide 24 hours notice and they had to be accompanied by a District employee. Further investigation revealed a total of three different procedures being practiced for the same request. To state the School District’s position we have Dr. Cecelia Dodge, Assistant Superintendent and Director of Special Education
School started and Jennifer Block Martin still had not got a placement for her twins. Hear how it turned out
I first met Olivia Boudreaux-Harris outside of San Francisco Unified School District headquarters the first day of School as she tried to register her son in a San Francisco public school. I caught up with her a few weeks later at her son’s old school KIPP Bayview Academy San Francisco to hear her story.
KIPP Bayview Academy retains slower learners in their grade. San Francisco Unified does not and socially promotes. Omar Khalif doesn’t hold back as he shares how he sees it.
As the school year progresses the San Francisco Unified School District School Assignment crisis deepens. Josie Owens updates us about some of the families that she has been advocating for to get a school assignment for their child that was workable.
It was the first day of school for most children of the San Francisco Unified School District however not the children of the hundreds of parents that went to School District headquarters to try to get a school placement that was acceptable to them. First we hear parent advocate Josie Owens.
We have seen controversy surrounding the new school assignment system in the past few years while it was being crafted by the San Francisco Unified School District Board of Education. Now the new system has been approved by the Board of Education and elements of it had been in operation for two years. Michelle Jacques-Menegaz, the just retired, four-year member of the Parent Advisory Council (PAC) of the San Francisco Unified School District joins me to discuss her insider’s view of what went on while the school assignment system was being developed. She shares her insight on the parent conversations that were held around the city by the PAC and Parents for Public Schools, San Francisco (PPS-SF). We discuss the current situation and the ongoing efforts that need to be pursued by the School District and parents to build quality schools. We explore some of the levels of trust or mistrust of the School District that parents are currently experiencing around the assignment system. Michelle Jacques-Menegaz a view from the inside.
The San Francisco School Board will decide shortly if it is going to implement a feeder school-assignment system for middle schools. Parent pushback, primarily by parents whose children were enrolled in one of the districts language programs caused the middle school assignment-process to be delayed for a year. It is now time for the School Board to vote on what will happen next. There are many conflicting issues. Rachel Norton joins me to explain what is in the proposal from the School District and what is not. Straight answers from Commissioner Norton “because people have a right to know”.
How do you change the culture and practice of a school district’s special education department?  San Francisco is trying to do just that after committing to enacting some of the recommendations of the Urban Special Education Leadership Collaborative audit which found many issues with what San Francisco was doing in special education. Joining me is Richard Carranza, Deputy Superintendent of the San Francisco Unified School District, and Cecilia Dodge, Assistant Superintendent and Director of Special Education and SELPA to explain what the District is doing to foster inclusion in all of the schools of the District and how this is going to effect almost every classroom, teacher, and child in the district.
In 2008, the San Francisco Unified School District's Special Education department decided to illegally censor the Community Advisory Committee for Special Education’s newsletter. This Committee is state-mandated to provide oversight of SFUSD’s special education department and reports directly to the  School Board. The School Board did not support the Committee and allowed the Committee to be censored.  As an aftermath of this cataclysmic event, the director of special education retired. Shortly after that, the head of the Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA) also left the school district. After one interim special education director, in the spring of 2010, the school district engaged the services of the Urban Special Education Leadership Collaborative to audit SFUSD’s special education department.   David Riley, Executive Director of the Urban Special Education Leadership Collaborative, joins me to elaborate on this far-reaching audit.
With the deadline for submitting applications for school assignment in the San Francisco Unified School District rapidly approaching the school district has advised its independent advisors who were scheduled to program the assignment system for free that their services were not needed. Does this action imperil the implementation of the system on time? Has school district transparency move back to the dark ages? Here’s the story from the design team’s perspective.
On this show my daughter, Mariel joins me to share her experiences at the Richmond district neighborhood center art program last year. Starting October 19, 2010, Saturday, there will be a series of of art classes offered for children from 5 to 12 years old. The classes are at the Richmond district neighborhood center at 741 30th Ave. (between Balboa and Cabrillo). This year the center will focus on Latin crafts. Classes start at 10 AM and you can preregister at 415-751-6600. Space is limited. There is no charge for the classes however a $10 donation would be greatly appreciated.
I visited the Oakland open studios and here is my chats with two artists there Lara Hoke and Laura Malone. the show continues next week-end. total running time 9 minutes. the photo of me in the video was taken by lara Hoke, all the other stills were taken by me.
The San Francisco School District and the United educators of San Francisco have reached a tentative agreement to establish the conditions for the next school year. I give my view of the settlement and what is still on the table from this parents point of view
Is San Francisco’s participation in “Secure Communities” more draconian than the new Arizona immigrant law? Will Secure Communities threaten to turn over 40,000 San Francisco residents to immigration to be deported?  Immigrant rights advocate Barbara Lopez joins me to tell me if it can happen and how it is intertwined with the politics of the Mayor’s race and the race for the top offices in the State. Barbara endorses Gavin Newsom for Lieutenant Governor, sort of, and we discuss some of the potential candidates for Mayor.  Barbara is never known for holding back and this is no exception. Barbara Lopez—will the dark ages return?
There have been extensive discussions lately that the seniority system keeps schools from removing unsuitable teachers. I asked Tom Ruiz, Senior Executive Director, Labor Relations and lead negotiator of the San Francisco Unified School District about this and other issues effecting schools. We discuss the current state of negotiations with the United Educators of San Francisco and confront this as well as prospects of a strike. Tom gives us a tiny peak at who won’t be coming back in the fall.  Will this be settled peacefully or will the relationship between OUR responsible school district and OUR dedicated teachers lay crumbled and shattered? Hear Tom Ruiz to help you decide what lies ahead. Then this parent shares what he sees and what he’s not hearing.
There have been extensive discussions lately that the seniority system keeps schools from removing unsuitable teachers. I asked Dennis Kelly, President of the United Educators of San Francisco, about this and other issues effecting schools. We discuss the current state of negotiations with the San Francisco Unified School District and confront this as well as prospects of a strike. Money, management purgatives, and teaching conditions are debated.  Will this be settled peacefully or will the relationship between OUR responsible school district and OUR dedicated teachers lay crumbled and shattered? Hear Dennis Kelly to help you decide what lies ahead. 
San Francisco is one of the unique cities of the world. In the United States it has a reputation for being ultra liberal. Those who live there view it’s demographics quite differently. If people think that San Francisco is child- friendly and spends lavishly on its school system they would be wrong. Margaret Brodkin has been a child advocate most of her life. She was Executive Director of the highly respected Coleman Advocates for thirty years, she was head of the city department of Children, Youth and Their Families and recently joined A New Day For Learning. I chat with Margaret about the past, the current issues, and directions for the future. This often outspoken and direct advocate does not disappoint in this 30 minute briefing.
District 7 Supervisor Sean Elsbernd shares some recent events
I attended a meeting where the Director of Community Outreach of the United States Department of Education Alberto Retana told us about title I school improvement grant funds. Watch an excerpt from his opening remarks and an analysis on which schools are effected and how parents can help guide this $24 million @ year gift.
With the San Francisco Unified School District facing a $130 million shortfall, parents are concerned that class sizes will soar and teachers will be fired. To the south of us, in Los Angeles their school district is facing a billion-dollar deficit. Can we look to LA as a model of what can happen in San Francisco? Returning from recently testifying before Congress, Bill Ring from TransParent® joins me to share what he has seen of the negotiations surrounding the new education bills in Sacramento that should qualify California for the “Race to the top” lottery. Teacher layoffs, school privatization, and school closures are the residue of systems that struggle to balance budgets while ignoring the educational needs of their children.
The city’s Rec and Park department has a laundry list of vital services and support for the hearing impaired, the sight impaired, and seniors. One such program is Project Insight run by Bernardus Oude Kamphuis, 6 foot 7 inch, “Gentle Ben”.  I first met Ben at Camp Mather, the family camp run by Rec and Park near the Hetch Hetchy Dam and Yosemite. Ben was leading a group of sight impaired young people in tent camping. Ben joins me on a Skype-video to tell me about Project Insight programs, who is served by them and how Project Insight may be discarded because of budget cuts. Can Rec and Park find the money to save this critical program? Watch or listen to Gentle Ben.
For more stories go to the menu on the upper left